The Mobile Marketer

Mobile is becoming not only the new digital hub but also the bridge to the physical world. That’s why mobile will affect more than just your digital operations — it will transform your entire business


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Mobile Ads; Is your business indulging? No time for more excuses…

Online ads are tricky and mobile ads are no exception. There’s a strong undercurrent of distrust towards advertising online thanks to the brilliantly awful tactic of unremitting pop-ups and numerous imitations of “Download now” buttons on download pages.

mobile-ads

There is always the intelligent option, however. Mobile ads can be supported by user data to the point that they’re not only relevant but timely too. And they don’t need to be intrusive, either. Native advertising on platforms like Instagram enables ads to resemble ordinary content (though explicitly identifying itself as an ad) and will appear on an individual’s feed who has shared data that implies they might be interested.

Because of the diminutive screen size of mobile devices, as well as the general trend of condensed, consumable content that mobile thrives on exporting, ads need to be concise. Instant gratification is a growing trend online – people want fast, unabridged results – so mobile advertising can’t beat around the bush.

Mobile use is growing rapidly – it’s now used more than desktops to browse the internet. With its popularity growing, marketers now have a new, evolving resource to reach their audience. Don’t get left behind!


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How to use mobile to enhance your brand and build audience development.

Success in brand publishing begins and ends with your audience, which you can define as anyone who comes into contact and engages with your content — not just your target demographic. In brand publishing, the problem you’re solving for is, “Where will incremental audience come from, and how can I maximize its value for my brand?” A combination of technology, partnerships, and experimentation will form the basis of your audience development plan. Here are a few places to start:

1.   Social Platforms — The pool of users who have opted to follow you over time make for a great initial surge of audience. Consider paid amplification for the content that yields the greatest value at your desired Cost Per Action (CPA). Think beyond just Facebook and Twitter! LinkedIn is rich in value for B2B engagement, while Pinterest, Instagram, Snapchat or any platform utilizing video all merit serious consideration for B2C engagement.

2.   Search — Research the keywords that matter most to your target audience and optimize your content.

3.   Recommended Media — Mobile platforms can deliver massive audiences from premium publishers in just about every vertical you can think of.

4.   Partnerships — Partnering with traditional media publishers can be a great way to deliver audience to your content. Mobile is not a stand alone medium. It still needs traditional media to drive the calls to action.

5.   Mobile — This is no longer some strange sub-set of audience. All of the above is responsible for delivering your target audience on mobile


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Mobile Outlook for Business in 2016

Mobile Research For Your 2016 Marketing Plans

I’ve got one word for your 2016 marketing:Mobile.

Ignore mobile at your peril.

Mobile isn’t about you, your product or your brand.

Mobile is about reaching your prospects, customers and audience where, when and how they want to interact with you. This isn’t a new message, I’ve been trying to tell you this for 5 years now…. 

Mobile marketing success requires contextual relevance. Specifically your audience expects to get easy-to-find, useful-to-current-need-and-location content fast. They want instant information gratification.

2016 Mobile Marketing Trends

woman with smartphone-1

1. 2016 Mobile usage

Mobile, specifically smartphones, is our constant companion. It’s where your audience spends its time.

  • 73% of people always have their mobile device with them (October 2015 Facebook research).
  • People pick up their mobile devices 150 to 200 times a day. Result: Almost 30 billion US mobile moments per day total. (Forrester)
  • Mobile sessions average 1 minute 10 seconds or 177 minutes per day.(2014 Google data)

Before you integrate this research into your 2016 mobile marketing strategy, let’s put that into global perspective:

  • 4.8 billion people globally will use mobile phones in 2016 (Forrester Research).
  • 75% of Internet users went online via a mobile device at the end of 2015. In 2016, mobile devices aren’t only the most popular or commonly owned device, but also they’re starting to overtake all other devices in terms of time spent online (GlobalWebIndex).

Mobile Internet Access

US adults engage in a variety of mobile activities including video, radio (including Pandora) and social media (including Facebook).

US Adult time spent on mobile

                        US Adult time spent on mobile

16 to 24 year olds spend an average of 3.25+ hours per day online on a mobile. Younger demographic mobile usage has grown at a faster rate than older ones.

Mobile Time Spent Online By Age-Chart-3Q2015

 

Online mobile usage is growing fastest in areas where there’s lower Internet penetration, namely Latin America and the Middle East/Africa.

Mobile Time Spent Online By Global Region- Chart-3Q2015

BUT, India breaks the mobile mold.

  • 85% of India’s digital population access the Internet via mobile, an increase of 30 percent since 2Q2012. During this period, Internet access via PCs/laptops remained stable.
  • Average mobile time doubled to 3 hour per day in 3Q2015 from 1.5 hours per day in 2Q2012.
  • 40% of mobile web users share their handset with someone else. This trend differs from any other market (GlobalWebIndex).
  • 11% of India’s Internet users live in rural areas yet represent 70% of India’s population.
  • No brand dominates the Indian mobile market. Samsung (40%) has the largest market share.

Indian Internet Penetration - 3Q2015 - Chart

Indian Mobile Device Sharing - Chart- 3Q2015

Indian Smartphone Market - 3Q2015- Chart

Bottom line: We’re approaching a Mobile Tipping Point when mobile usage exceeds that of all other devices combined. Global Web Index predicts this will happen in 2018.

Your mobile connected and savvy customer (B2B or B2C) demands a quality mobile customer experience.

  • Roughly 50% of US consumers expect to find the information they want or need based on their context on their mobile device.
  • Only 14% of companies Forrester surveyed use mobile to transform their customer experiences. Examples include Apple Pay, Starbuck order-ahead, mobile boarding passes.

Make marketing mobile first to reach your maximum potential audience.

  • Only 25% of companies will fully integrate mobile into their overall business strategies to transform their customer experience (Forrester Research).

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  1. Focus on people, your target audience in particular. Reach them when and where they’re ready to engage with you. Concentrate your marketing on your audience not devices or channels. You need a seamless process. Be prepared to track and attribute customer interactions cross channels.
  2. Understand your customer’s buying process. With a variety of devices and channels available, most prospects no longer go from initial connection to purchase. Research and shopping often occurs across devices or channels.
  3. Plan for thumb action. Appreciate how your various potential audiences will use their mobile device to find, research and purchase your product.

 

2. 2016 Mobile marketing

Be present on mobile so people can find you when and where they’re ready to engage with you.

  • Have mobile websites (65%) and mobile apps (65%), the top B2B marketing mobile tactics.

Mobile Marketing Charts Used By B2B Marketers - Chart

  • Anticipate your prospects’ mobile needs and provide appropriate information.
  • 29% of visitors immediately switch to another site if they don’t get what they need. Every second counts!!!

Mobile Speed Needed –2015 Google-1-1

  • Reduce steps. Mobile owners may use voice search or have trouble with a small screen. Also, offer other options such as phone.
  • Make calls-to-action easy-to-see and respond to. Think fat fingers.

Mobile up, website down

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Talk to your prospects and customers to understand how and when they want your information on a smartphone device. Don’t guess–ask!!!
  • Think mobile first. Include mobile in your overall marketing plans.
  • Give customers a reason to buy in your store. Offer them a special deal or other incentive.

3. 2016 Mobile apps

Marketers must make their app critical to their audience’s regular activities or tap into larger third party providers (like Google or Facebook) where their audience already spends their time.

  • 84% of US consumer mobile time per month is in 5 or less apps. Of this, retailers, banks and travel apps collectively receive less than 10-15% of mobile moments measured in minutes (Forrester Research).

Total 15 US Mobile Apps in 2015 - comScore - Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Plan for placement on third-party mobile apps. This may require budget just like advertising or content placement. Even if you have your own mobile app, you’ll probably still need the additional reach.

4. 2016 Mobile email

Email can be a filler activity. Translation: Employees read email and other content during their daily commute or other non-work hours.

53.5% was the mobile open share for 3Q2015 US marketing emails. Specifically, email click-to-open rates for 3Q2015 US marketing emails (Yesmail) were:

  • 2015 mobile click-to-open rates were 13.7% up 1.6 percentage points from 3Q2014.
  • 2015 desktop click-to-open rates were 18.0%, down 3.8 percentage points from 3Q2014.

Email opens by device - 2015 Chart

Email opens by device – 2015 Chart

Similarly, 48% of all emails were opened on computers, 40% were opened on mobile phones and e-readers, and 12% were opened on tablets according to 2Q2015 Experian data.

Customers check your email based on use:

  • Business emails were opened most on computers.
  • Multi-channel retailers were opened most on smartphones.
  • Travel emails were opened most on tablets.

Email opens by business type and device -2Q2015-Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Check email readability and rendering on mobile devices. Often this depends on your email provider. Unlike other aspects of your 2016 mobile marketing, this service shouldn’t require additional work on your part.

5. 2016 Mobile search

Mobile search supports and improves your other marketing goals.

  • 46% improvement in unaided brand awareness through mobile search.
  • 51% of people find new companies via mobile search (Google).
  • 53% of smartphone owners feel more favorable to businesses providing instructional videos. Don’t forget that you can use YouTube to help you.

Mobile search supports sales - Google

Location matters for mobile

Location data matters. It has an impact on your marketing and results.

Location data types - Graphic

Voice mobile search

Voice mobile search continues to gain traction as smartphones improve and owners get used to it. Only 13% of users have NEVER used this function. 

Mobile Voice Search-16-34 year olds-International-Chart-3Q2015-GlobalWebIndex-1

Mobile Voice Search - GraphicMobile Voice Search – Graphic

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Include a separate budget for mobile search. Make sure your phone number, address and email appear in results.
  • Claim your location on maps. 
  • Be visible on search alternatives like Yelp and TripAdvisor. 

6. 2016 Mobile commerce (or Mcommerce)

Mcommerce defined

Mobile commerce is the process of making a purchase transaction using a handheld device. More broadly mcommerce includes pre-purchase research through post-purchase support. You must streamline your buying process as much as possible to reduce steps and time. 

Mobile commerce transactions are expected to reach $115 billion in 2015 and $142 billion in 2016. Mobile commerce accounts for 35% of ecommerce. By 2020, mcommerce will account for 49% of ecommerce ($252 billion) due to its 17% compound annual growth rate. (Forrester).

  • 82% of people consult their phone regarding a purchase they’re about to make in a store. (Google)

Most mobile sales follow into 3 categories:

  • Apparel
  • Consumer electronics
  • Media 

US Mobile Commerce - 2015 to 2020 - Forrester Chart

Mobile Commerce-Chart-3Q2015-GlobalWebIndex-1

In 2014, retailers spent $1.2 million on smartphone investments and $550,000 on tablet investments (Forrester). Invest your marketing budget in:

  • Making checkout easier. Consider the phone speed.
  • Optimizing emails for smartphones
  • Increasing product reviews.
  • Getting prospects to visit your retail location.

As a marketer be prepared to respond to each step of the mobile purchase journey.  Location matters.

  • Make online purchase.
  • Make in-store purchase.
  • Get customer service or make appointment.
  • Get directions to physical location.
  • Tell others.

Mobile purchase interactions

 Shifting mobile purchase behavior

The number of people making mobile purchase transactions steadily increased to 30% in 4Q2015 (24% on a phone and 6% on a tablet) (Facebook IQ).The frequency of mobile purchases increased 35%.

  • Translation: More people bought on a smartphone and they purchased more often.

Mcommerce increase - Chart

 Cross-channel shopping

Cross-channel shoppers used computers over smartphones or tablets to purchase for these reasons (Facebook):

  • 54% of respondents thought bigger screens were easier to use for transactions.
  • 54% of respondents liked seeing all available products on a larger screen.
  • 26% of respondents found getting sufficient purchase information and product/retailer comparison difficult on a small screen.
  • 26% of respondents had trouble entering their data on a smartphone.

Mobile shopper's journey - Research data

Younger demographics are more likely to purchase via smartphones. Also, in regions like the Middle East where there’s better cellular than Internet service, mcommerce is used more often.

Customers use both computers and smartphones to research products but they’re more comfortable purchasing via a computer. This is particularly true of expensive, high-consideration products like cars and insurance.

Mobile Commerce - Research vs Purchase chart

For less important purchases, customers use their smartphone to research products and make choices while purchasing on a computer or at retail.

GlobalWebIndex points out that some mcommerce requires smartphone owners to have a payment app installed and to be willing to use it to make purchases. Current services include Google Wallet, Samsung Pay and Apple Pay.

Apple Pay Chart

This research didn’t include the growing use of products like Square where the seller handles the purchase process. For example, my hairdresser uses Square to handle transactions and I get an email to track my purchases.

It’s still early in the mobile payment adoption process. Therefore people are more likely to use their mobile device to make small regular or impulse purchases rather than expensive, high consideration purchases.

Multi-screen attribution matters.

  • 40% of businesses use first or last touch attribution. Remember you have customers, regardless of which device they use. (Google)
  • 90% of people use multiple devices for purchase related activities.(Google)
  • 40% of people who research purchase via a smartphone buy via a computer. (Google)

Cross device data increases mobile conversions across categories. (Google)But understand that this is a major hurdle for many businesses.

Cross device data improves results - Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Incorporate ways to track mobile research and purchase into your marketing. 

7. Wearables

The Internet of Things (aka IoT) has been on the radar for several years. It includes wearables, your home, your television and your car. To increase adoption, people must see its value to their lives.

Given the extreme speed of smartphone growth, wearables have lost some of their edge. People view these products as accessories, not for core enduser experiences. Many use targeted smartphone apps to accomplish the same functionality as a wearable.

  • 5 million US adults 18+ used wearables, including smartwatches and fitness trackers in 2015, up 57.7% over 2014. People wear these accessories or clothing at least once per month embedded with Internet-connected electronics and exchange data with a manufacturer or other connected device.
  • 7 million US adults are expected to own wearables by 2018 (eMarketer). Older Americans are expected to drive wearable growth when wearable health monitoring devices are available. Wearables will become a fashion statement as price decrease.
  • 74% of respondents plan to purchase a wearable device within the next year. Fitness is the key reason: 30% will purchase a fitness app and 27% will purchase afitness wearable. Smartwatches tend to be owned by younger, more affluent demographics. The challenge is still increased functionality.

US Adult Wearable Usage-2015 data-Chart- eMarketer

Wearable Usage By Age-2015-Chart - eMarketer

Wearables Consumers Plan to Buy-2015-Chart - eMarketer-1

The analysis overlooks the issue of tiny screen size for older demographics. Perhaps a smartwatch with voice activation may be better adapted to this market’s needs.

Context is key to 2016 mobile marketing

Where have you heard this before? (Again, for the last 5 years!)

Unlike PCs, your 2016 mobile marketing must be dynamic. It depends on where and what your audience is doing at that specific time and location. Their content matters. You need to deliver the right message at the right time based on your audience’s location and needs.

To tap into the 30 billion US mobile moments per day, Integrate your mobile and desktop marketing plans to respond to your audience on their terms, not yours.

 

 

A special thank you to my colleague Heide Cohen for putting this information together from the Forrester 2016 Mobile And App Marketing Trends Report. Heidi can be found here: 

Heidi CohenHeidi Cohen is the President of Riverside Marketing Strategies.
You can find Heidi on , Facebook and .


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Do You Offer WiFi in Your Store? Should You?

HOW EXACTLY DOES WIFI IMPACT RETAILERS FINANCIALLY

Any business owner will tell you that offering free Wi-Fi for guests is never free. 

Like all other monthly expenses that plague a business’s profit, Internet is too costly a resource to just give away. There are ways to generate a return on the monthly investment of providing Internet for your guests, such as collecting info through Wi-Fi sign-ons for your marketing database. You can also prompt them to follow/like/check-in on your company’s social media pages or submit a review using Yelp. These tactics are known as Wi-Fi marketing, as they assist your marketing strategy using the power of Wi-Fi.

Connect with Social Wi-Fi

Did you know that 77% of consumers spend more time in venues with Wi-Fi and 63% spend more money? Turnstyle transforms your Wi-Fi network into a powerful marketing asset that builds your customer database, promotes your business and collects valuable insights.

Engage with Campaigns

Location-based marketing is quickly becoming an essential part of every retailer’s business strategy. 72% of consumers are more likely to respond to marketing messages when they are received within sight of the retailer.

Measure with Analytics

“What gets measured, gets managed”, holds true for any organization. Our analytics feature takes the guess work out of determining the success of your marketing campaigns, while also giving you deep customer insights.

Retail Segment Average Sales Increase (%) Average EBITA %

Revenue Before WiFi/Mobile

Average EBITA %

Revenue After WiFi/Mobile

% Increase in EBITA
Overall 5.4% 5.5% 6.4% 17.3%
General Merchandise 6.5% 6.2% 8.2% 32.1%
Food, Drug, C-Stores 0.9% 4.8% 5.1% 5.8%
Hospitality 5.2% 6.1% 7.2% 17.4%


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The Mobile Revolution: How Mobile Technologies Drive a Trillion-Dollar Impact

Dramatic performance improvements in mobile communications standards have propelled mobile to become the fastest adopted technology of all time.

  • User costs have plummeted. The average mobile subscriber cost per megabyte decreased 99 percent between 2005 and 2013. Smartphones are now available for as little as $40.
  • Mobile network infrastructure costs have also fallen dramatically, while performance has soared—a 95 percent cost reduction (per megabyte transmitted) from second generation (2G) networks to third generation (3G) networks, and a further 67 percent drop from 3G to fourth generation (4G) networks. 111
  • Mobile data-transmission speeds have skyrocketed: 4G networks offer 12,000 times faster data-transmission speeds than 2G networks.
  • Consumer adoption of 3G and 4G standards has outpaced that of all other technologies, growing to nearly 3 billion connections in less than 15 years, and projected to exceed 8 billion connections by 2020.
  • Effective industry-driven collaborations to solve technical problems, set standards, and license intellectual property have been key enablers in this revolution.

Mobile is connecting and empowering consumers—everywhere.

  • Consumers derive enormous value from mobile. Our research across six countries—the U.S., Germany, South Korea, Brazil, China, and India—reveals that the value consumers place on mobile technologies ranges from $700 to $6,000 per user. The data show an aggregate annual consumer value for mobile technologies of $6.4 trillion across the six countries, above the cost of the devices and services.
  • This aggregate consumer surplus from mobile technologies exceeds the GDP of every country in the world except for the U.S. and China.
  • Mobile is especially valuable to emerging market consumers. In China and India, the consumer-reported value of mobile exceeds 40 percent of average income.
  • The market demand for continued innovation and investment is clear: 90 percent of 3G and 4G consumers report they want even faster data speeds, more coverage, more battery life, and many other improvements. With global data usage doubling every year, if this trend continues, data traffic will be 1,000 times greater within a decade. New technologies will be required to accommodate this expanding demand.
  • Consumers expect that mobile will continue to improve and transform their lives, delivering a broader range of services that will connect them with everything, everywhere.

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that adopt advanced mobile technologies are the fastest growing.

  • SMEs that are mobile leaders are winning. Typically, the 25 percent of SMEs that use mobile services more intensively see their revenues growing up to two times faster and add jobs up to eight times faster than their peers.
  • The mobile laggards among SMEs have revenue growth and job creation that substantially lag behind the leaders. With fewer plans to invest in mobile, these SMEs are at risk of being left further behind.
  • SME mobile leaders in emerging markets are leapfrogging older generations of technology still widely used in developed markets. The share of mobile leaders in Brazil, China, and India exceeds that in the developed countries examined.
  • Greater mobile adoption by SMEs can create jobs. If more SMEs expand their businesses at the rate of the mobile leaders, 7 million more jobs could be added in the six countries evaluated.

Mobile technologies are fueling economic growth, driving recovery from the global recession.

  • The mobile value chain generated almost $3.3 trillion in revenue globally in 2014 and is directly responsible for 11 million jobs.
  • Mobile is an engine of economic prosperity. In the six countries evaluated, mobile contributes more than $1.2 trillion in GDP. This equates to between 2 and 4 percent of each country’s GDP, and 11 percent in the case of South Korea.
  • The rapid growth of mobile is poised to continue. Across the countries evaluated, mobile’s share of GDP is growing at a 10 to 20 percent annual rate and can continue or even accelerate as consumers and businesses continually discover new applications for ever more advanced mobile technologies.

The mobile industry has made massive investment in new infrastructure and R&D.

  • Companies in the mobile value chain invested $1.8 trillion in infrastructure and R&D from 2009 through 2013, relying almost exclusively on private-sector funding.
  • Core technology (2G, 3G, and 4G) innovators take enormous risks by spending heavily on research and development with no guarantee of return on investment. Companies focused on mobile’s core technologies invest a larger share of revenue (21 percent) in R&D than those in any other industry except biotechnology—and more than companies in all other R&D-heavy industries, such as pharmaceuticals (14 percent).
  • Licensing of core technologies within the mobile industry is essential to its rapid and cost-effective advancement. Clear and cooperative licensing arrangements make it possible for companies across the value chain—and thus consumers and businesses—to access the most advanced technologies.
  • Many new and start-up companies are entering the mobile sector. In the past five years, venture capital (VC) investments in mobile have doubled as a percentage of total VC investments, reaching almost 8 percent ($37 billion) in 2014.

To ensure that the mobile revolution continues and expands, policymakers must support an environment that fosters innovation and investment. Future growth of mobile depends on continuing the policies that enabled the industry to get where it is today.

  • Strong patent protection is needed to encourage large and risky investments in mobile technology innovation.
  • Market-driven licensing is vital in order to ensure that technology innovations can be widely shared with others in the industry.
  • Industry standards are required to solve the industry’s most complex technology problems through open and meritocratic processes.
  • Continuous allocation and availability of additional radio spectrum, especially more licensed spectrum, is needed to keep pace with consumer demand.
  • To reap the economic benefit of fifth generation (5G) networks and beyond, mobile players will need to invest approximately $4 trillion in R&D and capital expenditures by 2020.
  • Weakening patent protection, intervening in the industry-driven standards-setting process, or curtailing technology licensing will jeopardize the future of mobile.

Read the original post here 


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A huge thank you to the PMI Orange County Chapter for the write up in the February issue of their “Milestones Magazine”

A huge thank you to the PMI Orange County Chapter for the write up in the February issue of their Milestones magazine

PMI-OC3

You can find out more information on their organization here