The Mobile Marketer

Mobile is becoming not only the new digital hub but also the bridge to the physical world. That’s why mobile will affect more than just your digital operations — it will transform your entire business


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Mobile Ads; Is your business indulging? No time for more excuses…

Online ads are tricky and mobile ads are no exception. There’s a strong undercurrent of distrust towards advertising online thanks to the brilliantly awful tactic of unremitting pop-ups and numerous imitations of “Download now” buttons on download pages.

mobile-ads

There is always the intelligent option, however. Mobile ads can be supported by user data to the point that they’re not only relevant but timely too. And they don’t need to be intrusive, either. Native advertising on platforms like Instagram enables ads to resemble ordinary content (though explicitly identifying itself as an ad) and will appear on an individual’s feed who has shared data that implies they might be interested.

Because of the diminutive screen size of mobile devices, as well as the general trend of condensed, consumable content that mobile thrives on exporting, ads need to be concise. Instant gratification is a growing trend online – people want fast, unabridged results – so mobile advertising can’t beat around the bush.

Mobile use is growing rapidly – it’s now used more than desktops to browse the internet. With its popularity growing, marketers now have a new, evolving resource to reach their audience. Don’t get left behind!

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Geo-Marketing vs. Geo-Fencing vs. Geo-Targeting: Who wins, and what’s next?

Geolocation as a concept is defined as the identification or estimation of the real-world geographic location of an object, such as a radar source, Internet-connected computer or mobile device. Interestingly, the earliest known example of geolocation dates back to the ancient Greeks who used stars to triangulate their position on land or sea.

geo

As a technology, Geolocation was first developed by the US and Germany in the 1930s and known simply as radar. However, geolocation, as we have come to realize it today, started with Google Maps in 2005.

Fast forward to the present day: Geolocation in marketing has become one of the latest industry buzzwords. But many mobile teams have only a vague idea of what it actually means, both in theory and practice.

Keep reading for an overview of what geolocation marketing means and why it matters.

Geolocation Marketing Explained

Geolocation marketing refers to the collection of data about a person’s physical location, usually provided through GPS satellites and internet protocol (IP) addresses. If you’ve ever opened a map app and zoomed in to see just how accurate the little blue dot is, that’s GPS-supplied geolocation data at work. Alternately, when you open a map on your computer’s browser, it will automatically open in your general location or city based on your IP address.

If the phone’s GPS is turned off (or if you are indoors), the location data is instead triangulated from cell towers. This method is less precise, but it still works relatively well. If you’ve opened your map while underground or in a building, you’ve probably received your location data from a cell tower.

So smartphones and handheld devices ping a satellite or cell tower to determine where in the world it is. And once the device obtains this information, it can then share it with maps, restaurant guides or weather and retail apps.

How Mobile Teams can Employ Geolocation Marketing

You can target users based on their location data in a three different ways.

Geo-Targeting

Geo-targeting predates mobile and simply refers to the act of reaching someone based on their location. Marketers generally track a web browser’s IP address rather than GPS location. Since the early days of the internet, websites used a visitor’s IP address to serve personalized content. For example a retail site would display the local currency and store locations based on the visitor’s country.

The downside is that IP addresses aren’t very precise, and it’s difficult for marketers to target specific neighborhoods based on IP addresses. Therefore this type of geo-targeting is more commonly used for broad regions, like an entire city or state. For marketing teams that want to go more granular, they can use a system called  geo-fencing, as discussed below.

Geo-Fencing

Geo-fencing is the mobile generation’s answer to traditional web-based geo-targeting. This type of targeting uses a smartphone’s precise GPS location rather than its IP address. It’s also updated while the person is on the move, so it’s suited for timely mobile messaging. For instance if a clothing store app detects a user near a physical location it can utilize time limit marketing tactics like offering up a discount coupon to encourage an immediate store visit.

A geo-fence can be as wide as a city, but it’s most effective when targeting smaller regions like specific neighborhoods or streets. These targets are especially useful for apps that want to direct foot traffic to brick-and-mortar stores or offer deals at nearby restaurants.

Beacons

Beacons are the most granular of the three location targeting methods. A beacon is simply a small device that receives location data from nearby devices via a smartphone’s Bluetooth signal. Because it’s Bluetooth-based, beacons can be deployed in areas with poor cell reception, such as the interior of a department store.

Beacon data tells the app precisely where in the store customers are walking, which helps marketers optimize the in-store experience by directing them for example to the new Spring collection based on data gleaned from previous app activity. But the obvious downsides is that the device’s Bluetooth signal must be turned on and has to be within a short distance of the Beacon’s very limited range. What’s more, beacons are difficult to use on public property, since they must be physically placed, secured and monitored.

The Best Way to Improve App Engagement With Geo-Targeting

For mobile teams in search of marketing tactics that increase engagement, geo-fencing is a good place to start. The precision of geo-fenced audiences makes them perfect for mobile campaigns, yet they don’t require a brick-and-mortar presence to be effective.

For example, a travel app might want to alert flyers that their gate changed via push notification. Instead of triggering the notification based on time, the app publisher could establish a geo-fence around an airport and trigger the message based on location instead. This way, they’ll deliver the message with perfect timing.

Likewise, an app that curates local restaurants or events could trigger recommendations based on the user’s neighborhood. Instead of offering broad suggestions (e.g. “Trending restaurants in your city”), geo-fencing enables suggestions that are personal and immediately valuable (e.g. “Welcome to [neighborhood]! Here’s what you need to see”).

Predictive Analytics and Geolocation Marketing

Predictive Analytics through the use of artificial intelligence will quietly driving geo-location marketing into the future.

While location-based offers are nothing new, predictive analytics algorithms will mine historical geolocation data and user behavior for marketers to provide just-in-time, localized offers before a user leaves his or her home. For example a retail app will forecast when a user will purchase a certain item based on their in-app browsing and past shopping behavior. Information from these patterns and data can then offer up discounts on the day or hour the user plans to go shopping for a specific product or service.

How to Get Started with Geolocation Marketing

Geolocation is intuitive from a marketing perspective, but it can be difficult to implement from an engineering standpoint. However, mobile marketers can easily get started by selecting a mobile marketing platform that already supports location-based campaigns.

Call me for more. 714-699-4249


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Six tips for successful mobile advertising in 2017 (#1: START NOW!)

As 2016 draws to a close, it’s a good time to reflect on “what worked” with mobile advertising this year and to summarize the successful strategies you should be looking at in 2017.

Here are 5 top tips:

1. Respect the user

Mobile devices are highly personal. Mobile users want to decide where, when and how they interact with brands on their devices. So put the user in control. Mobile ads should be opt-in, so the user decides whether or not to engage with a brand’s message.

Crucially, mobile ads should be easy for users to dismiss, with a prominent ‘close’ box. Finally, if the ad unit covers some content on the page, design the ad so it disappears when a user scrolls and only reappears when the user stops scrolling.

2. Use mobile-friendly ad formats

While they can look fine on tablets, desktop ads don’t look good on small smartphone screens. Instead, use mobile-friendly ad formats such as the IAB Rising Star adhesion unit.

Adhesion units look great on any mobile device because they take up about 10% of the screen and are anchored at the bottom in either portrait or landscape mode. They also produce strong results.

3. Target the right audience

Strong results don’t matter if the wrong audience is responding. The best advertising solutions providers have robust behavioral data that can be targeted as well on mobile as on desktop.

Lookalike models can be built to target scalable audience segments most likely to be receptive to a brand’s message and respond favorably to it.

4. Keep users engaged

Once you’ve targeted the right audience with mobile-first ad formats and the audience is responding to your ad, you want to keep them engaged and spending as much time as possible with your brand’s message.

One great way to keep users engaged is to use video as the main act in the creative. Users increasingly watch video on mobile, with a trend for larger screens.

Showing multiple videos is even more effective. Combine video with interactivity – inviting users to explore a brand further via photo galleries, feature demonstrations, product showcases and maps with directions to the nearest store – and you have the perfect recipe for deep user engagement.

5. Measure the right things

The last thing you want to do with your highly interactive, video-centric mobile campaigns is track results that don’t truly reflect the positive impact on brand metrics and sales lift. For example, it doesn’t make much sense to use clicks as a key performance indicator since clicks have been shown to have little to no correlation with conversions.

On smartphones, in particular, a significant percentage of clicks are accidental. Instead, more advanced metrics such as engagement rate, interaction rate and time spent are much more indicative of users actively paying attention to a brand’s message and ultimately being influenced by it.

After all, it’s deep user engagement that causes consumers to know, love and buy a brand, not a single or series of emails.


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How Does Mobile Initiate Digital Conversation?

Mobile communication has rapidly evolved, as data technology helps us take it seriously. While we once somewhat playfully awaited “the year of mobile,” we now set our sights higher in light of some serious advancements in the mobile space. The bottom line is that sophisticated audience targeting, propensity modeling, and cross-channel execution are all now in play.

Go Mobile 56With the prevalence of mobile lifestyle and progress openly in play — as far as technology, infrastructure, data science, and the evolving tools set — we are very much living the maturation of mobile. As consumers, and as marketers, we are the mobile opportunity.

 


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Mobile Outlook for Business in 2016

Mobile Research For Your 2016 Marketing Plans

I’ve got one word for your 2016 marketing:Mobile.

Ignore mobile at your peril.

Mobile isn’t about you, your product or your brand.

Mobile is about reaching your prospects, customers and audience where, when and how they want to interact with you. This isn’t a new message, I’ve been trying to tell you this for 5 years now…. 

Mobile marketing success requires contextual relevance. Specifically your audience expects to get easy-to-find, useful-to-current-need-and-location content fast. They want instant information gratification.

2016 Mobile Marketing Trends

woman with smartphone-1

1. 2016 Mobile usage

Mobile, specifically smartphones, is our constant companion. It’s where your audience spends its time.

  • 73% of people always have their mobile device with them (October 2015 Facebook research).
  • People pick up their mobile devices 150 to 200 times a day. Result: Almost 30 billion US mobile moments per day total. (Forrester)
  • Mobile sessions average 1 minute 10 seconds or 177 minutes per day.(2014 Google data)

Before you integrate this research into your 2016 mobile marketing strategy, let’s put that into global perspective:

  • 4.8 billion people globally will use mobile phones in 2016 (Forrester Research).
  • 75% of Internet users went online via a mobile device at the end of 2015. In 2016, mobile devices aren’t only the most popular or commonly owned device, but also they’re starting to overtake all other devices in terms of time spent online (GlobalWebIndex).

Mobile Internet Access

US adults engage in a variety of mobile activities including video, radio (including Pandora) and social media (including Facebook).

US Adult time spent on mobile

                        US Adult time spent on mobile

16 to 24 year olds spend an average of 3.25+ hours per day online on a mobile. Younger demographic mobile usage has grown at a faster rate than older ones.

Mobile Time Spent Online By Age-Chart-3Q2015

 

Online mobile usage is growing fastest in areas where there’s lower Internet penetration, namely Latin America and the Middle East/Africa.

Mobile Time Spent Online By Global Region- Chart-3Q2015

BUT, India breaks the mobile mold.

  • 85% of India’s digital population access the Internet via mobile, an increase of 30 percent since 2Q2012. During this period, Internet access via PCs/laptops remained stable.
  • Average mobile time doubled to 3 hour per day in 3Q2015 from 1.5 hours per day in 2Q2012.
  • 40% of mobile web users share their handset with someone else. This trend differs from any other market (GlobalWebIndex).
  • 11% of India’s Internet users live in rural areas yet represent 70% of India’s population.
  • No brand dominates the Indian mobile market. Samsung (40%) has the largest market share.

Indian Internet Penetration - 3Q2015 - Chart

Indian Mobile Device Sharing - Chart- 3Q2015

Indian Smartphone Market - 3Q2015- Chart

Bottom line: We’re approaching a Mobile Tipping Point when mobile usage exceeds that of all other devices combined. Global Web Index predicts this will happen in 2018.

Your mobile connected and savvy customer (B2B or B2C) demands a quality mobile customer experience.

  • Roughly 50% of US consumers expect to find the information they want or need based on their context on their mobile device.
  • Only 14% of companies Forrester surveyed use mobile to transform their customer experiences. Examples include Apple Pay, Starbuck order-ahead, mobile boarding passes.

Make marketing mobile first to reach your maximum potential audience.

  • Only 25% of companies will fully integrate mobile into their overall business strategies to transform their customer experience (Forrester Research).

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  1. Focus on people, your target audience in particular. Reach them when and where they’re ready to engage with you. Concentrate your marketing on your audience not devices or channels. You need a seamless process. Be prepared to track and attribute customer interactions cross channels.
  2. Understand your customer’s buying process. With a variety of devices and channels available, most prospects no longer go from initial connection to purchase. Research and shopping often occurs across devices or channels.
  3. Plan for thumb action. Appreciate how your various potential audiences will use their mobile device to find, research and purchase your product.

 

2. 2016 Mobile marketing

Be present on mobile so people can find you when and where they’re ready to engage with you.

  • Have mobile websites (65%) and mobile apps (65%), the top B2B marketing mobile tactics.

Mobile Marketing Charts Used By B2B Marketers - Chart

  • Anticipate your prospects’ mobile needs and provide appropriate information.
  • 29% of visitors immediately switch to another site if they don’t get what they need. Every second counts!!!

Mobile Speed Needed –2015 Google-1-1

  • Reduce steps. Mobile owners may use voice search or have trouble with a small screen. Also, offer other options such as phone.
  • Make calls-to-action easy-to-see and respond to. Think fat fingers.

Mobile up, website down

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Talk to your prospects and customers to understand how and when they want your information on a smartphone device. Don’t guess–ask!!!
  • Think mobile first. Include mobile in your overall marketing plans.
  • Give customers a reason to buy in your store. Offer them a special deal or other incentive.

3. 2016 Mobile apps

Marketers must make their app critical to their audience’s regular activities or tap into larger third party providers (like Google or Facebook) where their audience already spends their time.

  • 84% of US consumer mobile time per month is in 5 or less apps. Of this, retailers, banks and travel apps collectively receive less than 10-15% of mobile moments measured in minutes (Forrester Research).

Total 15 US Mobile Apps in 2015 - comScore - Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Plan for placement on third-party mobile apps. This may require budget just like advertising or content placement. Even if you have your own mobile app, you’ll probably still need the additional reach.

4. 2016 Mobile email

Email can be a filler activity. Translation: Employees read email and other content during their daily commute or other non-work hours.

53.5% was the mobile open share for 3Q2015 US marketing emails. Specifically, email click-to-open rates for 3Q2015 US marketing emails (Yesmail) were:

  • 2015 mobile click-to-open rates were 13.7% up 1.6 percentage points from 3Q2014.
  • 2015 desktop click-to-open rates were 18.0%, down 3.8 percentage points from 3Q2014.

Email opens by device - 2015 Chart

Email opens by device – 2015 Chart

Similarly, 48% of all emails were opened on computers, 40% were opened on mobile phones and e-readers, and 12% were opened on tablets according to 2Q2015 Experian data.

Customers check your email based on use:

  • Business emails were opened most on computers.
  • Multi-channel retailers were opened most on smartphones.
  • Travel emails were opened most on tablets.

Email opens by business type and device -2Q2015-Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Check email readability and rendering on mobile devices. Often this depends on your email provider. Unlike other aspects of your 2016 mobile marketing, this service shouldn’t require additional work on your part.

5. 2016 Mobile search

Mobile search supports and improves your other marketing goals.

  • 46% improvement in unaided brand awareness through mobile search.
  • 51% of people find new companies via mobile search (Google).
  • 53% of smartphone owners feel more favorable to businesses providing instructional videos. Don’t forget that you can use YouTube to help you.

Mobile search supports sales - Google

Location matters for mobile

Location data matters. It has an impact on your marketing and results.

Location data types - Graphic

Voice mobile search

Voice mobile search continues to gain traction as smartphones improve and owners get used to it. Only 13% of users have NEVER used this function. 

Mobile Voice Search-16-34 year olds-International-Chart-3Q2015-GlobalWebIndex-1

Mobile Voice Search - GraphicMobile Voice Search – Graphic

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Include a separate budget for mobile search. Make sure your phone number, address and email appear in results.
  • Claim your location on maps. 
  • Be visible on search alternatives like Yelp and TripAdvisor. 

6. 2016 Mobile commerce (or Mcommerce)

Mcommerce defined

Mobile commerce is the process of making a purchase transaction using a handheld device. More broadly mcommerce includes pre-purchase research through post-purchase support. You must streamline your buying process as much as possible to reduce steps and time. 

Mobile commerce transactions are expected to reach $115 billion in 2015 and $142 billion in 2016. Mobile commerce accounts for 35% of ecommerce. By 2020, mcommerce will account for 49% of ecommerce ($252 billion) due to its 17% compound annual growth rate. (Forrester).

  • 82% of people consult their phone regarding a purchase they’re about to make in a store. (Google)

Most mobile sales follow into 3 categories:

  • Apparel
  • Consumer electronics
  • Media 

US Mobile Commerce - 2015 to 2020 - Forrester Chart

Mobile Commerce-Chart-3Q2015-GlobalWebIndex-1

In 2014, retailers spent $1.2 million on smartphone investments and $550,000 on tablet investments (Forrester). Invest your marketing budget in:

  • Making checkout easier. Consider the phone speed.
  • Optimizing emails for smartphones
  • Increasing product reviews.
  • Getting prospects to visit your retail location.

As a marketer be prepared to respond to each step of the mobile purchase journey.  Location matters.

  • Make online purchase.
  • Make in-store purchase.
  • Get customer service or make appointment.
  • Get directions to physical location.
  • Tell others.

Mobile purchase interactions

 Shifting mobile purchase behavior

The number of people making mobile purchase transactions steadily increased to 30% in 4Q2015 (24% on a phone and 6% on a tablet) (Facebook IQ).The frequency of mobile purchases increased 35%.

  • Translation: More people bought on a smartphone and they purchased more often.

Mcommerce increase - Chart

 Cross-channel shopping

Cross-channel shoppers used computers over smartphones or tablets to purchase for these reasons (Facebook):

  • 54% of respondents thought bigger screens were easier to use for transactions.
  • 54% of respondents liked seeing all available products on a larger screen.
  • 26% of respondents found getting sufficient purchase information and product/retailer comparison difficult on a small screen.
  • 26% of respondents had trouble entering their data on a smartphone.

Mobile shopper's journey - Research data

Younger demographics are more likely to purchase via smartphones. Also, in regions like the Middle East where there’s better cellular than Internet service, mcommerce is used more often.

Customers use both computers and smartphones to research products but they’re more comfortable purchasing via a computer. This is particularly true of expensive, high-consideration products like cars and insurance.

Mobile Commerce - Research vs Purchase chart

For less important purchases, customers use their smartphone to research products and make choices while purchasing on a computer or at retail.

GlobalWebIndex points out that some mcommerce requires smartphone owners to have a payment app installed and to be willing to use it to make purchases. Current services include Google Wallet, Samsung Pay and Apple Pay.

Apple Pay Chart

This research didn’t include the growing use of products like Square where the seller handles the purchase process. For example, my hairdresser uses Square to handle transactions and I get an email to track my purchases.

It’s still early in the mobile payment adoption process. Therefore people are more likely to use their mobile device to make small regular or impulse purchases rather than expensive, high consideration purchases.

Multi-screen attribution matters.

  • 40% of businesses use first or last touch attribution. Remember you have customers, regardless of which device they use. (Google)
  • 90% of people use multiple devices for purchase related activities.(Google)
  • 40% of people who research purchase via a smartphone buy via a computer. (Google)

Cross device data increases mobile conversions across categories. (Google)But understand that this is a major hurdle for many businesses.

Cross device data improves results - Chart

Actionable 2016 mobile marketing tactics:

  • Incorporate ways to track mobile research and purchase into your marketing. 

7. Wearables

The Internet of Things (aka IoT) has been on the radar for several years. It includes wearables, your home, your television and your car. To increase adoption, people must see its value to their lives.

Given the extreme speed of smartphone growth, wearables have lost some of their edge. People view these products as accessories, not for core enduser experiences. Many use targeted smartphone apps to accomplish the same functionality as a wearable.

  • 5 million US adults 18+ used wearables, including smartwatches and fitness trackers in 2015, up 57.7% over 2014. People wear these accessories or clothing at least once per month embedded with Internet-connected electronics and exchange data with a manufacturer or other connected device.
  • 7 million US adults are expected to own wearables by 2018 (eMarketer). Older Americans are expected to drive wearable growth when wearable health monitoring devices are available. Wearables will become a fashion statement as price decrease.
  • 74% of respondents plan to purchase a wearable device within the next year. Fitness is the key reason: 30% will purchase a fitness app and 27% will purchase afitness wearable. Smartwatches tend to be owned by younger, more affluent demographics. The challenge is still increased functionality.

US Adult Wearable Usage-2015 data-Chart- eMarketer

Wearable Usage By Age-2015-Chart - eMarketer

Wearables Consumers Plan to Buy-2015-Chart - eMarketer-1

The analysis overlooks the issue of tiny screen size for older demographics. Perhaps a smartwatch with voice activation may be better adapted to this market’s needs.

Context is key to 2016 mobile marketing

Where have you heard this before? (Again, for the last 5 years!)

Unlike PCs, your 2016 mobile marketing must be dynamic. It depends on where and what your audience is doing at that specific time and location. Their content matters. You need to deliver the right message at the right time based on your audience’s location and needs.

To tap into the 30 billion US mobile moments per day, Integrate your mobile and desktop marketing plans to respond to your audience on their terms, not yours.

 

 

A special thank you to my colleague Heide Cohen for putting this information together from the Forrester 2016 Mobile And App Marketing Trends Report. Heidi can be found here: 

Heidi CohenHeidi Cohen is the President of Riverside Marketing Strategies.
You can find Heidi on , Facebook and .


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Happy New Year Marketers! Now let’s get back to mobile marketing.

Revealing the Value of Mobile Within Marketing Programs

http://cdn.cmo.com.au/dimg/700x700/dimg/mobile%20cloud%202.jpg

There was a lot of discussion about incorporating mobile into the marketing mix in 2015, but just how important or effective can a mobile-marketing strategy be? A study by the Aberdeen Group’s Omer Minkara demonstrates the performance gains that can be achieved with well-planned strategies that incorporate precision push-notifications, an effective use of data, and regular performance assessments.

The key findings are outlined below, however, the full report can be downloaded for free from Aberdeen’s website.

Screen_Shot_2015-02-18_at_8.43.42_PM

The figure above speaks for itself. Across every metric, the companies with mobile touch-points are seeing much better results than those without. From these findings, adding a mobile element to your marketing strategy is a no-brainer, but what if you’ve already started? You’ve got the mobile optimized site, perhaps even an app, but what comes next?
Screen_Shot_2015-02-18_at_8.44.00_PM
Marketing 101 is all about targeting the right audience with the right message. Precision push-notifications refers to sending messages that are timely and context sensitive. This is the difference between pushing a mass message to every person on your marketing list and pushing a personalized offer to customers when entering your venues geo-fence.

Screen_Shot_2015-02-18_at_8.44.12_PM

The more data the better, but at the most basic level, being able to segment your users by age, gender, visit frequency or product preferences and then message them accordingly will increase your probability of success.

 

Screen_Shot_2015-02-18_at_8.44.23_PM

We all know the importance of benchmarking, split testing, and optimizing. The same rules apply here. Figure out what works best, and then continue tweaking it for even greater results. The main key performance indicators (KPIs) being open rates for messages and redemption rates for coupons.

If you haven’t thought about incorporating mobile marketing into your strategy, then you’ve probably already fallen behind the competition. If you have invested in mobile, then maximize your efforts with precision push notifications powered by data. Finally, establish your benchmarks, split test, and optimize your campaigns not once, but on an ongoing basis to ensure future success.